Electric indian - Keem-o-sabe

January 13th, 2011

Electric indian - Keem-o-sabeELECTRIC INDIAN

  • Keem-o-sabe
  • United Artists
  • 1969
  • USA

Ke-mo sah-bee (pronounced /ˌkiːmoʊˈsɑːbiː/; often spelled kemo sabe or kemosabe) is the term of endearment used by the intrepid and ever-faithful fictional Native American character, Tonto, (and sometimes the Lone Ranger himself) in the very successful American radio and television program The Lone Ranger. It is sometimes translated as, “trusty scout” or “faithful friend” in Potawatomi.
(Wikipedia)

Electric indian was a studio group formed from session musicians by producer Len Barry. It’s main purpose was to exploit the popularity of American Indians in the late 1960s media. Neither Barry or Vincent Montana Jr. - who did the arrangements with Jimmy Wisner - didn’t exactly know how the Indian music should sound like, so they imagined it and this was the result. Even though the music wasn’t even close to the native Indian music, the first single cut “Keem-o-sabe” on Marmaduke Records reached the US Top 20 in the Billboard Hot 100. After the success of the first release, United Artists took the group to release an album. And there it was, Keem-o-sabe.

Percussion driven music is what this album is all about. There’s cover songs such as bboy friendly version of Stevie Wonder’s “My cherie amour”, Jerry Butler’s “Only the strong survive”, JR Walker & The all stars‘ “What does it take to win your love”. Then there’s a cover of Blood, Sweat & Tears‘ “Spinning wheel” that usually don’t go wrong in any case. And there’s a magnificent bboy friendly breakbeat version of Marvin Gaye’s “I heard it through the grapevine”. There’s also another tight bboy track, apparently their own composition, “Rain dance” that has been played around a lot. Overall this is at the same time weird and really amusing album,


My cherie amour


Spinning wheel


I heard it through the grapevine


Rain dance

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00

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