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Raulzinho & Impacto 8 - International hot

August 9th, 2012

Raulzinho & Impacto 8 - International HotRAULZINHO & IMPACTO 8

  • International hot
  • Equipe
  • 1968
  • Brazil

1934 born Raul De Souza - actually his real name is João José Pereira De Souza - is a well known trombonist from Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. He started his career in the mid 1950s and has played with many of the key figures in the Brazilian music scene. In the mid 1960s he released his first solo album - using his pseudonym Raulzinho (little Raul) and the second album with his group Impacto 8 was released in 1968. Within his career, Raul De Souza has played with Sergio Mendez, Flora Purim, Airto Moreira, Milton Nascimento, Sonny Rollins, Cal Tjader among countless others. After spending great share of his career in United States he has returned to his home country Brazil. Not to rest though, as he’s still active composer and trombonist today.

The album starts and ends with the same song, a heavy latin take of Herb Alpert’s “Treasure of San Miguel” here named “Teasuro de Sao Miguel”. It’s very dancefloor friendly with banging breakbeat drums and catchy horns that follow quite strictly the original. The only minus is the length, it’s only one minute and fortyfive seconds long. The second song on side a is a heavy Portuguese version of “Spinning wheel” with nice organ work. Originally recorded by Blood, Sweat & Tears, it’s somehow similar to Doors hit “Light my fire”, almost all the versions are good. Then comes a funky uptempo boogaloo track called “Boogaloo Bill no. 2″ with two very short but really banging breaks that somehow remainds me of the legendary “Amen” break of The Winstons. Next up is the uptempo latin track “Two beat manchild” followed by uptempo breakbeat latin jazz take “Fried bananas” and a nice version of Brenda Holloway’s “You’ve made me so very happy”. B-side opens with heavy organ driven midtempo soul jazz version of Marvin Gaye hit “Mercy Mercy”. It’s followed by a mellow groover “Hello Monalisa”. Next is a heavy downtempo take of Herbie Hancock’s “Cantaloupe island”. Then comes another highlight of the album, an uptempo and funky take of “I’ve got the feelin’” with raw vocals of Raul De Souza. Needless to say it’s a very dancefloor friendly with tight breakbeats and catchy horn stabs. Finally comes uptempo “slick” before the replay of “Teasuro de Sao Miguel” ends the album.


Teasuro de Sao Miguel


Spinning wheel


Boogaloo Bill no. 2


Two beat manchild


Fried bananas


You’ve made me so very happy


Mercy Mercy


Hello Monalisa


Cantaloupe island


I’ve got the feelin’


Slick

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under funk, jazz, latin, south america | No Comments »

The Eliminators - Loving Explosion

August 6th, 2012

The Eliminators - Loving ExplosionTHE ELIMINATORS

  • Loving explosion
  • BRC
  • 1972
  • USA

The Eliminators was first formed in the early 1960s as a school band in Atkins High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Ten years later, the original members were all playing in different groups in Winston-Salem area, but were unsatisfied. They started to seek old friends from the high school times and finally reunited to start their musical career again. They cut this one album together and it was released on BRC label in 1972. They are widely credited as the baddest and the funkiest band ever come from the Winston-Salem area. Apparently they got so popular in their area that the record was later released also on BRC’s parent label Brunswick to get a wider distribution. That didn’t work out very well, or then the band was so loved that people listened their records to pieces as the album is very rare and seldom seen. They toured actively before their split in 1976. Although it looked totally impossible since, the glad news in Winston-Salem Journal few months ago tells us that the band was again reunited after being separated for 36 years.

The Eliminators is a good example of soulful funk with a hint of disco. There’s very fat sound on their playing, with loads of percussion and tight funky drumming without any cheesyness. The title track, funky soul track “Loving explosion” starts the album. It’s followed by another disco’ish funky laidback soul track “Get satisfied” that reminds me of B.T. Express‘ first albums. “Love your woman” is a similar tune too, although it has a little more pace. Then comes one highlight of this album, uptempo percussion heavy disco funk jam “Give it up”, with some guitar work that I’m not that fond of. The mellow ballad “Try, try, try” ends the first side. Side b starts with socially aware “Blood donors needed (give all you can)”, which is a grooving midtempo disco funk track with a conscious message in it. After a ballad “Taking love, and making love” comes another two highlights, Funky percussive midtempo flute driven instrumental take of the second track called “Get satisfied (pt. 2)” followed by an uptempo disco funk track “Loose hips” with a massive percussion break in the middle. Last one is again another mellow but funky soul tune “Rump bump”.


Loving explosion


Get satisfied


Love your woman


Give it up


Try, try, try


Blood donors needed (give all you can)


Taking love, and making love


Get satisfied (Pt. 2)


Loose hips


Rump bump

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under disco, funk, north america | No Comments »

Dillard Crume and The Soul Rockers - Singing the hits of today

July 25th, 2012

Dillard Crume And The Soul Rockers - Singing The Hits Of TodayDILLARD CRUME AND THE SOUL ROCKERS

  • Singing the hits of today
  • Alshire records
  • 1969
  • USA

Missouri born Dillard Crume knew already in his childhood that he wanted to be a gospel singer. That happened right after the family had moved to Chicago, Illinois when a gospel group was formed out of the Crume brothers. The Crumes did have a pretty huge family, there was eigt boys and two girls so forming a group wasn’t that hard. Six of the brothers formed the group and it was called - surprisingly - The Crume Brothers. That time young Dillard was only nine years old but still strongly into singing, as he was taught by his older brother A.C. Crume. The Crume Brothers did gain success and they became quite famous in their home town of Chicago. Ten years after the forming of The Crume Brothers Dillard was approached by the famous vocal group Five Blind Boys of Jackson, Mississippi to become their guitarist and backing singer. This was an offer not to be declined, so nineteen year old Dillard joined them and toured with them extensively throughout the United States. After the Five Blind Boys Crume became a member of the Highway QCs of Chicago, Illinois. That didn’t last long and he left the gospel scene for awhile playing r’n'b, rock n’ roll, blues, soul and whatever was popular, even calypso. Then in the late 1960s Dillard Crume formed his own band called The Soul Rockers. They did one album and toured all over the United States. After ten years of earthly life he returned to the gospel field as the lead singer of the world famous Soul Stirrers in 1976. Soul Stirrers was by the way the same group that brought up Sam Cooke years earlier. Dillard Crume has been an active singer to this very day and is still touring the world with his latest group Dillard Crume and the New Soul Stirrers.

This album by Dillard Crume and the Soul rockers is one of those popular cover albums released all over the world in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s. It was released by the budget label Alshire. As said, the album is about soul, blues and funk covers from that era. There’s good versions of songs like Booker T & the MG’s‘ “Doin’ our thing”, Tony Joe White’s “Polk salad Annie” and The Isley Brothers‘ “That’s the way love is”. There’s three tracks that should be highlighted. The breakbeat driven funky soul number “Mini dress”. The Dyke & The Blazers hit “Let a woman be a woman let a man be a man”, also a good breakbeat driven dancefloor track with a nice break. And last but not least the best track on the album, James Brown hit “Mother popcorn”, here as a nice breakbeat version suitable for cyphers everywhere. Dillard Crume follows the original pretty strictly as he calls his horn player in the end “Maceo, c’mon, blow your horn”… On the other hand I have read rumors of Maceo Parker himself playing on this record so you never know. This album is really scarce except in Scandinavia. For some reason great share of the pressing was shipped to Finland and Sweden, although nowadays it pops out rarely even here.


Doin’ our thing


Polk salad Annie


That’s the way love is


Mini dress


Let a woman be a woman let a man be a man


Mother popcorn

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under blues, funk, north america, soul | No Comments »

The Creations - Groovy Love

July 16th, 2012

The Creations - Groovy LoveTHE CREATIONS

  • Groovy love
  • Gallo
  • 1974
  • South Africa

I have to say I don’t know anything about these guys expect they come from South Africa and they’re funky. It appears that there’s absolutely no info about them on the internet - or at least I can’t find any. That’s a shame because their sound is pretty tight and the record is a true curiosity. For some weird reason they, or their label Gallo, have censored three tracks from the album by scratching the record on their tracks. I fixed one of those when digitizing the album, but the other two I left alone. Maybe because they weren’t that good at all.

The album starts very strongly. First track “Soul satisfire” is very funky midtempo jam with loads of wah-wah, organ and synth melodies and even sort of a break. Next one, the instrumental “Follow me” starts as a funky midtempo jam before having a very hectic middle part and then getting back to mellow funkiness. There’s again very funky wah-wah’s, wailing organs and tight drumming on this one. Then comes another instrumental, time to time a little cheesy, but still mostly very good “Groovy love” with some wild organ work and funky guitars. Last track on side a is the best one on the album, “Treat me right”. It starts with a drum-guitar break and continues as a midtempo funky jam with nice guitar riffs, organ and funky drumming. They could’ve left some of the dominating electric guitar out though, it kinda disturbs me. First one on side b is “You’re gonna lose it”. It’s followed by “We feel great”, again a quite nice funky track. After that comes another standout track, the funky wah-wah and organ driven uptempo groover “Organ grinder”. It’s followed by “Chain reaction”. The last on side b is the mellow but groovy “Soul unlimited”


Soul satisfier


Follow me


Groovy love


Treat me right


We feel great


Organ grinder


Soul unlimited

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under africa, funk, soul | No Comments »

The Button Down Brass - Firedog!

July 13th, 2012

Button Down Brass - FiredogTHE BUTTON DOWN BRASS

  • Firedog!
  • DJM records
  • 1976
  • UK

The Button Down Brass’ Firedog! is somewhat the UK equivalent to the Cop show themes. The sound is quite similar and there’s four songs that appear in both albums. The Button Down Brass was one of the top notch British easy listening / lounge bands. In their 21 active years they released dozens of albums, participated in production library records and other projects. Too bad most of their recordings are very uninteresting lounge cheese. Luckily there are some exceptions to that. The Button Brown Brass was led by one of the foremost musicians in UK, Ray Davies - not to be confused with The Kinks frontman with the same name. Within his over 50 year career, Davies has worked with pretty much everyone worth to mention; The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Liza Minelli, Burt Bacharach, Quincy Jones, Henry Mancini and so on. So when The Button Down Brass were recording all the covers they did, Davies was the man to do the arrangements and he also conducted them. Ravies was of course doing some original compositions too.

The 1976 released album Firedog! is one of the best The Button Down Brass ever recorded, along with the other album from the same period, Funk in hell, it’s also the most funky. Although the slight easy listening cheesiness is creeping in time to time. Albums starts with the “Theme from Police story”, the theme from the NBC crime drama Police story, originally composed by Jerry Goldsmith. With some weird moog sounds and funky horns it’s a nice uptempo detective funk track. Next up is Morton Stevens composition “Hawaii 5-0”, It’s quite similar to original first, but then there’s a funky middle part with a percussion break that makes it interesting. While “Hawaii 5-0” is better than the Henry Mancini version, the next one also on both albums, “Theme from Police woman” is not that banging than the one in Cop show themes. But despite the slight lazyness, the melancholic trumpet and the lack of the opening break, it’s still somehow a little funkier than the Mancini take. Next one is the an original composition of Ray Davies called “Firedog!” and it’s among the best tracks of the album. Funky wah-wah, percussions, horns and a tight break in the middle makes it almost a perfect detective funk track. It’s followed by a little light, but still funky “Theme from the Rockford files”, originally by Mike Post and Pete Carpenter. Last track on side a is “Mc Cloud theme”, an uptempo take of the David Shire original from the NBC police drama McCloud with western styled guitars and nice horn stabs. B-side opens with a nice version of Billy Goldenberg’s “Kojak”. It’s followed by the theme by Harry South from the British television police drama The Sweeney, also ok version. Next comes another standout track, “Quiller”, originally written by Richard Denton and Martin Cook taken from the British drama series Quiller. It starts with a nice break and is overall a very good version. The last three tracks are the ones I like the least. First the Glen Larson written theme from the US detective series Switch, then another Ray Davies composition “Theme from Kiss of blood” and finally the “Columbo theme” originally by Billy Goldenberg. Despite the few weak tracks, Firedog! is one of the best kept secrets of the British detective funk cover albums.


Theme from Police story


Hawaii 5-0


Theme from Police Woman


Firedog!


Theme from the Rockford files


Mc Cloud theme


Kojak theme


The Sweeney


Quiller


Switch theme


Theme from Kiss of blood


Columbo theme

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under cinematic funk, europe, funk, soundtrack | No Comments »

Henry Mancini - Cop Show Themes

July 10th, 2012

Henry Mancini - Cop Show ThemesHENRY MANCINI

  • Cop show themes
  • RCA Victor
  • 1976
  • USA

1994 passed Henry Mancini is one of those composers who don’t need much of an introduction. There’s not that many people who hasn’t heard about him or at least something he has done. The Pink Panther is maybe the best know of his works. Mancini started his career in 1946 at the age of 22 when he joined the newly re-formed Glenn Miller orchestra. There he played piano and did arrangements. In 1952 he moved to work for the Universal Pictures music departments. He stayed there only six years but during that time he contributed music for over 100 movies, for example The Creature from the Black Lagoon, It Came from Outer Space, Tarantula and so on. In 1958 Mancini started to work as an independent composer and arranger composing music for films and television as well as did several other recordings too. While most of his over 90 albums are included in the easy listening, big band or light classical categories, he did of course some funkier albums too.

In 1976 was released Cop show themes and it’s not hard to figure by the name what is included in this album. It’s full of Mancini versions of well known detective series, of course there’s few of his own compositions included too. First up is a composition of Mancini himself, “The mystery movie theme” from the The NBC Mystery Movie series. Next is the Mancini’s version of the chase styled theme “The streets of San Francisco” from the police drama of the same name, originally composed by Patrick Williams. It’s followed by “Bumper’s theme” from the crime series The Blue Knight, also composed by Mancini. Then comes a medley of “Kojak” composed by Billy Goldenberg and “Theme from S.W.A.T.” by Barry De Vorzon. Latter being especially nice version. B-side opens with “Baretta’s theme” from the detective series Baretta, originally written by Dave Grusin. Then “The Rockford files” by Mike Post and Pete Carpenter. Last two tracks are originally composed by Morton Stevens; first legendary theme from “Hawaii five-0” and then the reason why people usually search for this record, “Police woman”. The opening break from “Police woman” was included in Cut Chemist’s “Lesson six” (from Jurassic 5’s EP). It’s of course very nice bboy break as well.

 
Henry Mancini - Cop Show Themes
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In the Japanese version of Cop show themes are included three bonus tracks that I want to mention too. Lalo Schifrin’s “Mission impossible theme” originally from The Big Latin Band Of Henry Mancini (1968), Mancini’s own compostion “Peter Gunn” from 1959 and Quincy Jones’ “The Ironside theme” originally from Mancini’s Big Screen Little Screen (1972)


Mystery Movie Theme


The streets of San Francisco


Bumper’s theme


Medley: Kojak / S.W.A.T.


Baretta’s theme (keep your eye on the sparrow)


The Rockford files


Hawaii five-0


Police woman


Mission impossible theme


Peter Gunn


The Ironside theme

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under cinematic funk, north america, soundtrack | No Comments »

Mustafa Özkent ve Orkestrası ‎- Gençlik ile elele

July 7th, 2012

Mustafa Özkent - Gençlik ile eleleMUSTAFA ÖZKENT VE ORKESTRASI

  • Gençlik ile elele
  • Evren Plakları
  • 1973
  • Turkey

Compared to what he has done during his long career, Ankara based Turkish composer, arranger, conductor, producer and guitarist Mustafa Özkent is still relatively unknown to the big world. He started his career as early as in 1960 in a pop group called The Teenagers. At some point in the early 1970s he formed his own orchestra, simply named Mustafa Özkent ve Orkestrası (Mustafa Özkent and Orchestra). In 1973 the first album Gençlik Ile Elele (in English Hand in hand with youth) was released and the second album Elif was released in 1975. They also released two 45s (in 1972 and 1974). During that time in 1975 – 1976 Özkent was studying in the Academie D’e music D’ixelles in Brussels. For a short period in 1976 his close friend and a fellow Turkish musician Baris Manço was also spending time in Brussels. In 1976 he was also working in a big band for the Montreal Olympic Games as an arranger and guitarist. During his career Özkent has been an in-demand session guitarist, arranger and conductor and has worked closely with numerous Turkish musicians and band including his close friends Baris Manço, Okay Temiz and Mogollar. And he has still been active throughout the 2000s.

For his new orchestra, he called in organist Umit Aksu (later of Aksu Orkestrası fame), second guitarist Cahit Oben as well as two drummers and a percussionist (not mentioned anywhere). Özkent himself played the lead guitar naturally. In 1972 the freshly founded independent label Evren had heard about Özkent and decided to give him a shot to do an fully instrumental album wit mixture of jazz, psychedelic rock, funk, traditional Anatolian sounds and new stereo effects. The album was recorded with a live take but some effects were added later.

In those days, outside the core of Western musical culture, an instrumental album with somehow psychedelic improvisations was never called “psychedelic”, more labelled as A Go-Go, often dance rhythm related item. Acid jazzrock was more often one influence for such music.
(Mustafa Özkent)

Gençlik Ile Elele is clearly the funkiest of all anatolian rock albums that ever came to my ears. With it’s heavy drumming, hard grooving organs, funky Anatolian melodies and of course the large amount of breaks it belongs to my all time favorites. The album starts with a heavy midtempo funker “Üsküdar’a Giderken. It’s followed by the massive “Burçak Tarlaları” that starts with a huge break and continues as a heavy Anatolian funk track with some traditional melodies and psychedelic electric guitar work. There’s even an another heavy break in the end. Next one is called “Dolana Dolana”. It’s an uptempo heavy funker with some electric guitar and organ melodies and a huge break in the beginning. Then comes “Karadır Kara”, another midtempo track that starts with a percussive break and the same break pops up few times during the track. Next one is again a midtempo psychedelic funk track called “Emmioğlu”, starting with a break and having the heavy electric guitars there too. The first track on side b is “Çarşamba”, again a heavy midtempo funker. Next up is one of my favorites, “Zeytinyağlı”, an uptempo breakbeat funker with electric guitar melodies and short breaks every now and then. Then comes another midtempo one called “Silifke” with sound very similar to the rest of the album. Fourth track on side b is “Lorke”, another uptempo track with a slightly different and more straight forward beat than the others. Last one is the very hectic, almost batucada sounding “Ayaş”. And for the last words, the album cover.. what’s happening in there?


Üsküdar’a Giderken


Burçak Tarlaları


Dolana Dolana


Karadır Kara


Emmioğlu


Çarşamba


Zeytinyağlı


Silifke


Lorke


Ayaş

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under anatolian rock, asia, funk | No Comments »

Remigio Ducros - La palla é rotonda

July 1st, 2012

Remigio Ducros - La Palla E RotondaREMIGIO DUCROS

  • La palla é rotonda
  • Vroommm
  • early 1970s
  • Italy

There were several small Italian production music library companies that were active some years from late 1960s to maybe mid 1970s and then just faded away. Vroommm was one of those, it was extablished in late 1960s and released small but diverse selection of records. In honor of the ongoing football European championships I bring up one of their records, a concept album by the Italian composer Remigio Ducros, La palla é rotonda (in English ‘the ball is round’). Different styled compositions relating to sports and especially football was the thing in this album.

Musically this album is quite diverse and maybe not funky as could be expected by the composer. There’s weird moog tracks, dark and spacy synth tracks, light and moody vocal tracks and so on. There’s highlights of course too. The downtempo synth track “Calcio al ralenti” is pretty ok as well as the midtempo moogy and funky “Una partita agitata”. There’s however four tracks above the others. “Contropiede”, a guitar heavy latin influenced uptempo groover. A funky midtempo breakbeat track “La rimonta”. A midtempo drum and percussion track “Pressing” and a little similar sounding but funkier “Sgambetto”. This nowadays very rare album is maybe not worth the full price but if seen cheap enough, don’t hesitate to pick it up.


Calcio al ralenti


Una partita agitata


Contropiede


La rimonta


Pressing


Sgambetto

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under cinematic funk, europe, library | No Comments »

Perez Prado - Tequila!

June 28th, 2012

Perez Prado - TequilaPEREZ PRADO

  • Tequila
  • Cannon Records
  • 1974
  • Belgium

Everybody has heard about the king of mambo, Perez Prado. At least at some point. But most of the people don’t know that there was two of them. Brothers Damason Pérez Prado and his little brother, Pantaleón Pérez Prado both shared the same artist name. Neither of the Perez Prados used their first name, but only their last names and the confusion was quite obvious. While Damason Pérez Prado was mainly working on the States, his bass playing brother was in Europe acting as the “true king of mambo”. Even when Pantaleón Perez Prado died in 1983, the press announced the death of his brother as the news was only about the death of Perez Prado. In Spanish speaking countries people have two last names. First one is the paternal (father’s surname) and second is maternal (mother’s surname). That’s the reason for the name issue. So, Damason Pérez Prado was the more famous brother, the king of mambo, but his brother was the funkier one. Even though a lawsuit in 1956 eventually restrained Pantaleón from making further use of the name Perez Prado, there was still few of his albums released in the 1970s under that name. And they were pretty banging.

This album was most propably released originally in Italy, as it was licensed from Beat Records. I’m just not sure what the name of that version is. Tequila! was the name of the Belgian release and the album was also released in the UK by the name Now. Anyways, whatever the name is, it’s a very strong album. There’s no weak tracks, it’s just full of very funky afro-cuban groovers with a loads of breaks. Check for yourself.


Brazil


Tommy


El Manisero


Escandalo No 1


Chicago Banana


Tequila


Cangrejo


Smack!

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under afro-cuban, europe, funk | No Comments »

The Poets of Rhythm - Gauloises Blondes presents The Poets of Rhythm

June 25th, 2012

The Poets of Rhythm - Gauloises Blondes presents The Poets of RhythmTHE POETS OF RHYTHM

  • Gauloises Blondes presents The Poets of Rhythm
  • Soulciety Records
  • 1995
  • Germany

The Munich based funk band The Poets of Rhythm started to form in the late 1980s or very early in the 1990s when Boris Geiger and Jan Weissenfeldt got into the world of late 1960s and early 1970s American musical phenomena often called deep funk or raw funk. They started to get their band together and soon the first line-up was ready; Boris Geiger on vocals and percussion, Jan Weissenfeldt on guitar, Max Weissenfeldt on drums, Jan Krause on bass, Till Sahm on organ, Michael Voß on trumpet and Malte Müller-Egloff on alto saxophone. Their first 45 was released on 1992 and the next year was released their debut album Practice what you preach. They had recorded material even earlier but it had to wait until the 21st century to be released. The band was notorious for having a numerous different aliases that they used when releasing 45s during the years. These aliases included Bo Baral’s Excursionists, Bus People Express, Dynamic Soundmakers, Karl Hector & The Funk-Pilots, The Mercy Sluts, The Mighty Continentals, Neo-Hip-Hot-Kiddies Community, The New Process, The Pan-Atlantics, The Polyversal Souls, Soul Sliders, Soul-Saints Orchestra, Whitefield Brothers and The Woo Woo’s among some others. They also released a couple of “compilation albums” where all the tracks were actually performed by them under different incarnations.

The Gauloises Blondes presents The Poets of Rhythm EP was one of these compilations. It had only five tracks on it, but they’re all performed by The Poets of Rhythm under a different name. And they’re all quite typical Poets of Rhythm sounding midtempo tracks - except the last one, that has a little more pace. First one is a flute driven funk track called “Into space and time” performed by The Poets of Rhythm. The second one on side a is a little heavier but slightly monotonic funker “Fifty yards of soul” by Whitefield Bros. “Spooky grinder”, by The Woo Woo’s opens the b-side. It’s followed by Soul Saints Orchestra’s “Bag of soul”, which is an instrumental take of their Christmas funk track “Santa’s got a bag of soul”. Last one is a live take called “Breakdown to tighten up”. It’s an uptempo part of the live set of The Poets of Rhythm with a massive break in the middle.


The Poets of Rhythm - Into space and time


Whitefield Bros. - Fifty yards of soul


The Woo Woo’s - Spooky grinder


Soul-Saints Orchestra - Bag of soul


The Poets of Rhythm - Breakdown the tighten up (live)

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, funk | No Comments »
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