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Posts Tagged ‘Finland’

Grupo Irakere - Chekere

July 31st, 2012

Grupo Irakere - ChekereGRUPO IRAKERE

  • Chekere
  • Cuba
  • 1976
  • Finland

1973 formed Irakere is no doubt one of the best known groups that ever came from Cuba and they’re one of the most influental bands too. They created their own style with mixing together almost everything rhythmic they heard; jazz, funk, rock and traditional Cuban rhythms. They were busy with album recordings and even more busy with travelling around the world. They also used to record albums wherever they were performing and that was the case in Finland too. Irakere visited Finland in 1976 to play at the Turku Jazz festival and at the same time they visited the Finnvox Studio in Helsinki to cut an album that was then released on Finnish Love Records‘ Cuban music oriented sublabel Cuba. Otto Donner produced the album by the way. The time they visited Finland they weren’t yet known in the United States and they were playing with their original tight line up with Oscar and Chucho Valdés, Arturo Sandoval, Paquito D’Rivera, Jorge Alfonso and Enrique Plá among others.

Album starts with one of the best version I have heard of their standard “Chekere son”, a great funky son track with tight start and a nice break. Then comes two mellow tracks “38½” and “En nosotros”. They’re followed by another funky uptempo one, the magnificent studio version of “Juana 1600″. Side b opens with similar sounding uptempo Cuban funk track “Moja el pan”. It’s followed by Chucho Valdes‘ piano track “Este camino largo”. Then comes “Xiomara” that starts with a heavy beat and continue as a groovy midtempo vocal number. Last track is the horn driven Cuban funk track “Illa” with some serious fuzz guitar, heavy percussion work and a sort of a break.


Chekere son


38½


En nosotros


Juana 1600


Moja el pan


Este camino largo


Xiomara


Illa

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under afro-cuban, caribbean, europe | No Comments »

Charles Williams - Love is a very special thing

July 19th, 2012

Charles Williams - Love is a very special thingCHARLES WILLIAMS

  • Love is a very special thing
  • EMI
  • 1975
  • Finland

Born in Columbus, Georgia, Charles Williams – not to be confused with the saxophonist Charles Williams who recorded for Mainstream records – started his musical career very early. He was only six when he had his first performance in a local church. Soon after a short period abroad, his family had moved to San Bernardino, California. Few years later, he started studying classical music at Music Teachers’ Association. By the late 1960s he had switched to rock and soul, and his first public performance from that period was in a religious concert in 1969 in front of 11000 people. And he got standing ovations. After a short period when he had a jazz trio called Sensations, he formed his own soul rock group called Manna. On that group was playing one Billy Carson, who followed Charles to Finland and later played drums and percussion with for example Jukka Tolonen and Timo Kojo. Billy Carson did by the way the first rap recording in Finland with Kojo in 1982 (it was released in 1983 on Kojo’s Time won’t wait album). They also recorded an album with Manna but it never got released - although the raw mix versions got some airplay in California. By the mid 1970s he had already recorded most of the tracks intended for his forthcoming album when he met a Finnish girl in Cali and followed her up north to Finland.

“When I got here I soon realised that there wasn’t that much soul music in Finland. One day I heard Kirka singing his cover of “Living for the city” and it sounded nice to me. I contacted his label (EMI) and I told I had done such music myself. They took my music for listening and they liked it. So next I went to the Marcus Music studio in Stockholm to do the final mixing for the album. Why Stockholm? Because I knew Marcus Music was the place in Scandinavia.”

The band backing Charles Williams on this album (except on “Reason to make you smile”, that was backed by Finnish musicians) was called Psalm 150. They were all white gospel-rock band - although they called themselves funky gospel band. They recorded two albums in mid 1970s but the second one remains unpublished to this very day. Their only album that came out was called Make up your mind and it was released in 1974 by Manna music. It’s also released in Sweden by Pilot if somebody got interested. I guess by the time Love is a very special thing was released, Finland wasn’t ready for soul music as sophisticated as this was. The album sold poorly and the distribution was very minimal, thence the album is extremely rare and in some circles very in demand.

Musically Love is a very special thing is very soulful and calm toned with strings and Williams’ falsetto. It starts with the blaxploitation anthem sounding instrumental “Theme from long road” with strong percussion work by Greg Eckler, wistful strings and very catchy horns stabs. Williams had said that this tune came to his mind while driving his car on a highway. There was nothing good on the radio so he started to hum something he wanted to hear. For me it’s clearly the best track on the album. Next is a guitar heavy ballad called “Helen”. It’s followed by the reason why the record is in demand, the crossover soul track “Standing in the way” where Williams does himself his own backing chorus. “Standing in the way” was also released as 45, but it’s ever rarer than the LP. It was also reissued on 45 by Lifesaver records ten years ago. Last track on side a is another ballad, “Reason to make you smile”, the only track that was composed and recorded in Finland. B-side starts with another funky midtempo soul track “Change it”, which was also on the a side of the “Standing in the way” 45. According to Williams it wasn’t intended to be for dancefloors, it was a reflection of a person shouting ‘I wanna change it’. Next comes again another ballad, the title track “Love is a very special thing” followed by the instrumental of “Standing in the way” called simply “Standing”. Finally the last track, epic ten minute “Your life” ends the album. It’s a main theme from the film Too late to wait - although I’m not sure if such film was ever made. Overall Love is a very special thing is quite a nice album as a listening experience, though I personally don’t consider it worth the 200-300 euros people keep asking for it.


Theme from long road


Standing in the way


Change it


Standing


Your life

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, soul | No Comments »

Eero Koivistoinen Music Society - Wahoo!

July 4th, 2012

Eero Koivistoinen Music Society - Wahoo!EERO KOIVISTOINEN MUSIC SOCIETY

  • Wahoo!
  • RCA Victor
  • 1973
  • Finland

1946 born saxophone player Eero Koivistoinen is undoubtedly one of the biggest names in Finnish jazz scene. He has done a long career as a musician, composer, arranger, conductor and producer. His career started in the mid 1960s in an orchestra playing experimental avant-garde jazz. The first solo album of Eero Koivistoinen was a concept album of poems by well known Finnish poets sung by well known Finnish singers Eero Raittinen, Vesa-Matti Loiri and Seija Simola. That album was called Valtakunta (The Kingdom in English) and it was released in 1968. In the beginning of 1070s Koivistoinen moved to the United States to study in the famous Berklee College of Music in Boston for three years. After almost 50 years and dozens of albums he’s still an active character playing with the next generation of Finnish jazz cats today.

In 1973 was released the album Wahoo! with a one-off group called Eero Koivistoinen Music Society. Involved in this sort of a supergroup was many of the very same musicians that were playing in most of the Finnish jazz records that time. And what a line-up that was; Eero Koivistoinen on saxophones (tenor, soprano, sopranino and electric soprano), Juhani Aalto on trombone, Kaj Backlund on trumpet, Juhani Aaltonen and Unto Haapa-aho on reeds, Esa Helasvuo, Esko Linnavalli and Olli Ahvenlahti on Fender Rhodes, Ilpo Saastamoinen and Ilkka Willman on electric guitar, Heikki Virtanen and Ilkka Willman on bass and Edward Vesala, Esko Rosnell, Reiska Laine and Sabu Martinez on drums and percussion. The album sounds exactly what you expect with a line-up like that. Syncopated funky jazz fusion with really tight rhythms by the set of two drummers, two bassists and two guitarists.

The album starts with the strong midtempo saxophone driven jazz groover “Hot c”. Almost eight minutes of action is what you get here. It’s followed by “7 up”, more jazzy but at least equally heavy track. Next up is “6 down”. With it’s eight minutes of some serious wah-wah, funky Rhodes and drums it’s among the best tracks on the album. B-side starts with the epic almost 11 minutes long “Suite 19”. It starts with an experimental sounding four minute intro before turning into an uptempo wah-wah driven, percussive, almost blaxploitation sounding track. Next track, “Bells” is the only mellow track on the album. Last but not least is the downtempo funky fusion title track “Wahoo!”. Overall this album is really great but not that magnificent it’s often praised. And in my opinion it’s not worth the 300-400 euros people ask for it. Luckily for all the non purists it was reissued in 2001. The reissue – both cd and vinyl – come with the cover coloring it should’ve been. Originally the print messed up the cover and it’s colors were a little different what they were intended to be.


Hot c


7 Up


6 Down


Suite 19


Bells


Wahoo!

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, jazzfunk | No Comments »

Midsummer Finngroove Mix of 2012

June 23rd, 2012

Midsummer Finngroove Mix 2012

It’s Midsummer and that is the time when most of us Finns flee to our summer cottages on countryside and drink our asses off and listen to old Finnish music. This year I was having an urban Midsummer at home and I was kinda inspired of all the bonfire and sausage grilling pictures people kept posting on facebook. I decided to celebrate the Summer Solstice my way and do a small mix of late 1960s and early 1970s Finnish groovy music. Since I decided to do it yesterday it’s done in a haste, I hope you still enjoy it. cheers.

Listen to it here..

or here..

Midsummer Finngroove Mix 2012 by Mista Tibbz

 
 
 

or download it here..

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under beat, europe, funk, pop, schlager | No Comments »

Kirka - Kirka

January 16th, 2012

Kirka - KirkaKIRKA

  • Kirka
  • Scandia
  • 1969
  • Finland

Right after his first full length, a “live” album called Kirka keikalla, was released this second album of Kiril “Kirka” Babitzin simply called Kirka. It was an album of studio recordings but it wasn’t actually an studio album. It was a compilation of his earlier recordings that were originally released as 45s between 1967 and 1969. So if you’re not a format purist and accept only these quite scarce 45s, this is your choice to get the good ones. The sound quality of this album is pretty ok compared to some other Scandia releases from the same period.

The albums starts with the breakthrough song of Kirka career, “Hetki lyö”, originally released in 1967. It’s a cover of “Beat the clock”, written by Richard Gottehrer and Jonathan Stroll and released by the US pop rock group The McCoys in 1967. It’s more rock and at the same time more funk than the original and somehow always gets people moving whenever it’s playing. Next one is a funky country track “Okolona river bottom band”, a cover of Bobbie Gentry’s original from 1968. “Kellon soiton kuulla saan” (literally “I can hear the bell toll”) is a cover of “No help from me”, the b-side track from the biggest selling hit “Green tambourine” of the US psychedelic pop rock band The Lemon Pipers, written by their headman, Ivan Browne. Originally it was released in 1967, Kirka recorded this almost the same sounding version a year later. Next to mention is “Pitkän tien pää” (literally “End of the long road”). A pretty good cover of the 1969 original “Spinning wheel” by Blood, Sweat & Tears. it has hard drums, nice horns and all, but sadly no break. There’s however two tracks over the others on this one. “Yksinäisyys kolkuttaa” (literally “loneliness is knocking”), a cover of Nancy Sinatra’s “Happy” from 1969, written by Lee Hazlewood. It’s a funky uptempo groover and in my opinion, it’s even better than the original. The wailing organ solo of Esko Linnavalli in the middle of the song is really amazing and reminds me of the Alan Hawkshaw stuff. In this album is also included four songs from the Jörn Donner movie 69, “Alku kaiken kauniin”, “Igor”, “Mr. wonderful” and “Voin haaveesi täyttää”.

In an interview Kirka tells that Jörn Donner was making a movie at that time and needed the music for it. So he rushed into the Scandia office and told that he needed a singer, a good one, and he knew Scandia had one. So Donner picked up Kirka to sing the soundtrack songs that were first released on a four track 45 ep and later on Kirka’s self titled debut studio album. Kirka also tells that Donner already had in mind some songs made by Claes af Geijerstam that were already recorded in Sweden and he wanted Kirka to sing them in Finnish.
- shapeoffinnstocome.blogspot.com

So Kirka did sing his raw vocals to these four tracks and the rest is history. Included in these four songs is the toughest track on the album, an uptempo funk track called “Igor”. It starts with an open break and soon the bass joins in. In the middle there’s a solo that sounds much like sitar and therefore “Igor” has been labeled widely as a psychedelic sitar funk track. But it’s actually not a sitar, it’a a regular guitar with really loose strings and they just made it sound like a sitar. Innovative huh? Jörn Donner also made an international release of his movie and he wanted an international version of the soundtrack too. So he took the same four soundtrack songs sung this time in English by the Swedish rock singer Tommy Körberg. And there was included of course “Igor the dog”. But that’s another story and I’ll tell you about it later. Nowadays Kirka album is quite hard to find and not that cheap. But it’s still an original and beats easily those youtube ripped mp3’s people seem to be playing in bboy jams these days.


Hetki lyö


Okolona river bottom band


Kellon soiton kuulla saan


Pitkän tien pää


Yksinäisyys kolkuttaa


Igor

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, funk, pop, rock, soul | No Comments »

Esko Linnavallin Orkesteri - Joulusoitto

December 20th, 2011

Esko Linnavallin Orkesteri - JoulusoittoESKO LINNAVALLIN ORKESTERI

  • Joulusoitto
  • Scandia
  • 1971
  • Finland

First of all, a brief history of the man himself. Esko Linnavalli was a talented orchestra leader, arranger, composer and especially a very good pianist and organist. He started his career as a classic jazz pianist, but soon in the mid 1960s he started his job as an arranger and conductor at Scandia records. Later in the 1970s Linnavalli moved to RCA for a production manager vacancy. As an organist, Esko Linnavalli is clearly one of my favorites in Finnish music history and he is also behind some of the great Finnish jazz records. On the rocks (together with Esa Katajavuori), Finnish design, A good time was had by all to name a few. He was also involved with UMO jazz orchestra and Day is Over. And of course he and his band backed numerous Finnish artists throughout the years - Kirka, Danny, Carola, Lasse Mårtenson, Vesa-Matti Loiri, Kari Jalkanen (Kari Tapio) and so on… Esko Linnavalli died relatively young in 1991. He was only 50 years old.

In 1971 Esko Linnavallin Orkesteri (Esko Linnavalli Orchestra) released a Christmas album called Joulusoitto (Christmas play in English). With sublime arrangements of mr. Linnavalli, it’s one of the grooviest “traditional” Christmas albums I’ve ever heard. And if that’s not enough to convince you, there’s more. There’s pretty impressive line up with some of the key players of Finnish jazz scene; Christian Schwindt, Esa Katajavuori, Esa Pethman, Esko Rosnell, Heikki Laurila, Ilpo Kallio, Jörgen Petersen, Ossi Runne, Rauno Lehtinen, Reino Laine and more. The tracks are all instrumentals (except the scat vocals on one track) and mostly covers of the well known Christmas carols. There’s two original compositions of Linnavalli too. First up is “Rekiretki” (”Sleigh ride”, originally by Leroy Anderson), a latin influenced midtempo groover. Next up is Linnavalli’s own composition, “Joulusoitto” (Christmas play), a downtempo track with a slight easy listening feel. “Valkea Joulu” (”White Christmas” by Berlin Irving), “”Kello, joka ei soinut” (”The bell that couldn’t jingle” by Bobby Winton and Burt Bacharach) and “Sataa lunta” (”Let it snow” by Jule Styne) are all jazzy takes of the Christmas classics. Next up ar two really groovy ones. “Joulupukki matkaan käy” (”Santa Claus is coming to town by John Frederick Coots and Haven Gillespie) is a funky version of this standard with great arrangements and even a break at the start. “Kuuraparta” (”Frosty the snowman by Walter “Jack” Rollins and Steve Nelson) is also a very good version of the standard with some funky drums and great synth works of Esko Linnavalli. “Joululaulu” (”The Christmas song by Mel Tormé) is a groovy downtempo one with a nice tender feeling. The last track is funky “Joulupukin aatto-ilta” (Santa Claus’ Christmas eve) by Esko Linnavalli. It’s a very nice ending to a very nice album. I just can’t praise this album enough, it’s that good.


Rekiretki


Kello, joka ei soinut


Sataa lunta


Joulupukki matkaan käy


Kuuraparta


Joululaulu


Joulupukin aatto-ilta

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under christmas, easy listening, funk, jazz | No Comments »

Matti Oiling - Happy jazz band

November 29th, 2011

Matti Oiling - Happy Jazz BandMATTI OILING

  • Happy jazz band
  • Finnlevy
  • 1970
  • Finland

Happy jazz band was the debut album of Matti Oiling’s band Oiling Boiling. Well, at this point they still called themselves Happy Jazz Band. Although the album is credited to Matti Oiling, it’s clearly an Oiling Boiling album. It’s very similar to their second album Oiling Boiling but somehow more raw and primitive. In a good way of course. In 1971 they did one soundtrack 45 to a movie called Saatanan radikaalit under the name Matti Oiling’s Happy jazz band. Right before they changed their name to Oiling Boiling. The line-up is pretty much the same as in Oiling boiling, although there was some changes and some additional musicians playing at the latter album. There’s a tight small combo playing in this one. Matti Bergström on Fender bass, Paroni Paakkunainen on saxophones, flute and African finger piano, Nono Söderberg on guitar, Tuomo Tanska on organ and Matti Oiling on drums and percussions.

Here are the sleeve notes from the album

Can you imagine a lathe-hand who does lathing in his time off? Or a brick-layer who lays bricks for relaxation after his day’s work? Hard to picture, isn’t it? But I do know a number of professional musicians who relax by making music after a hard and sometimes quite exhausting session at the studio. But the difference lies in what you play in your leisure time. The musicians performing on this record have found a musical form that brings satisfaction and variation and gives them the chance to experiment and to create something new and still untried. That’s real work therapy.

Matti Oiling - a first-class drummer - has gathered around him a number of fellow musicians whose vision and musical comprehension are harmonious and whose ways of thinking run parallel. They are all musicians of the young generation, to whom pop music and jazz music are equally close and whose artistic resources provide them with an opportunity of blending these musical elements. And when they want to make music, the music they make is pervaded by a sense of cheerfulness and humour. You’ll really enjoy this LP. Matti Oiling’s solo - something he cooked up himself - is called “Oiling Boiling”. The recipe, with spices, is provided by Matti himself. The “sound” idea is produced on a Lesley accessory. Paroni Paakkunainen’s soaring imagination is a triumph. His musical skill, uninhibited and humour-imbued, is full of surprises and a wicked Mephistophelean laughter pops up in his performances. Among his many instruments is the Bengal flute - featured in the piece by that same name. He has an impressive range of musical color. Matti Bergström - apart from his Fender bass - introduces his Bascello, which lends its very “different” sound to the item entitled “Stratosphere Inspiration”. Nono Söderberg performs his solo “3/8 Of Nono” on his 1-Watt guitar amplifier - not to save the ears of the rest of the group but just to produce the right instrumental color. Tuomo Tanska - organist, pianist and arranger - also appears on this disc as a composer. “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” (Setä Tuomon tupa) is his musical vision of a classic work. Thanks to this record I have spent a very rewarding forty-five minutes - and listening to it, one can only feel a gluttonous delight in its surprising and revitalizing musical ideas. Pop and jazz fans will find something that distinguishes this LP record from other LPs - a terrific dose of happy music.
- Ossi Runne, Conductor, Finnish Broadcasting Company TV1

I must say that Happy jazz band is a one truly great album and well worth to get. It’s kind of a mix between 1960s soul jazz, funky drumming, jazzfunk fusion, contemporary jazz sounds and traditional songs with a twist of Slavic melancholy and some weird vocals. And it’s strong from the beginning. The opening track, maybe some kind of a theme song, “Oiling boiling” starts with a banging break with additional tumbas played by Martti Metsäketo. There’s over a minute of drum-tumba breakbeat with some really weird vocals, then a short bridge and then the breakbeat continues again to the full almost two and half minutes length. Great song although it’s still quite unclear to me what are they talking about. As said in the sleeve notes, “Setä Tuomon tupa” (literally “Uncle Tuomo’s cabin”) is a composition of Tuomo Tanska, and you can hear that. It’s almost six minutes long midtempo organ driven r’n'b flavored track with heavy organ improvisation of Tanska that remind me somehow of the works of Jimmy McGriff and Jimmy Smith. “Baron’s beat” is a strong soul jazz track with really nice organs. It’s just too short, only two and half minutes. “Africa” instead is over seven minute jazz track with some great guitarwork of Nono Söderberg and really groovy drumming. The last track, “Pässi ja porkkana” (”A ram and a carrot”) has a quite slow start but turns into a great uptempo jazzfunk track with heavy breakbeat drumming of Oiling, wild guitars of Söderberg and wailing saxes of Paakkunainen. In the middle there’s a sort of a hectic break too. While the original is pretty rare and fetches serious prices around hundred euros, there’s a reissue from 2002 that should be more easily obtained.


Oiling boiling


Setä Tuomon tupa


Baron’s beat


Africa


Pässi ja porkkana

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, funk, jazz | No Comments »

Jörgen Petersenin orkesteri - Mukana musiikki

October 9th, 2011

Jörgen Petersenin Orkesteri - Mukana MusiikkiJÖRGEN PETERSENIN ORKESTERI

  • Mukana musiikki
  • Top Voice
  • 1975
  • Finland

Jörgen Petersen (RIP) was born in Randers, Denmark, in 1931. He was a very talented child and started his first band when he was only 12. By the age of 14 he was already making his living by playing trumpet as the youngest professional musician in Denmark. In 1954 he joined the Al Stefano’s orchestra, that was the most famous Latin-American music orchestra in Denmark that time. With them he visited Finland in 1956. The same time he also met his future wife and in 1957 moved to Finland for good. Petersen started to play with various bands and orchestras until he got a vacancy in the trumpet section of Radion Tanssiorkesteri (Radio Dance Orchestra) - which lasted 13 years. In 1959 he also joined the very popular Ronnie Kranckin Orkesteri (Ronnie Kranck’s Orchestra) for eight years. It didn’t take long until Petersen found himself working for PSO - Pohjoismainen Sähkö-Osakeyhtiö (Nordic Electric Ltd.), a major record label in 1960s and 1970s Finland. He was a producer, songwriter, arranger, conductor and a trumpet player - a true jack of all trades. And a very productive one too. During his whole career he participated - as a musician, writer, arranger, conductor or producer - within over 5500 recordings. And that’s really exceptional in a small country like Finland. Petersen was also the first Finn ever to score a song in a Billboard Top 100 list - although he wasn’t actually a Finn that time. It was his breakthrough song “Boulevard of broken dreams” that hit the US charts in 1961. Petersen finally took the Finnish citizenship in 1981 and remained very active character in Finnish music scene until 1987 when his doctor forbad trumpet playing from him and he withdraw himself from the publicity. Petersen passed away in 2009 at the age of 77.

During his active years, Petersen released several albums of his own too. Either as himself or with his orchestra. In 1975 he released an album called Mukana musiikki (Including the music in English). It was a typical album for him, full of instrumental covers of contemporary songs and few original compositions - all with a certain easy listening feel of his “golden trumpet”. There’s versions of songs like “Era”, “Jeannie, Jeannie”, Ding-a-dong”, “Let me be the one”, “El Bimbo” and “Emmanuel”. All quite dull easy listening numbers. The stand out songs on this album are the first three on the side b. First up is a song called “Strip-tease”, a song written by Paul Lupano (a pseudonym of song writer and lyricist Martti Piha) that was first recorded by Petersen in 1959 - although it was a pretty different version back then. “Strip-tease” is a very funky uptempo track with a quite heavy drum and percussion beat, but with slightly easy listening feel at times. Almost like the music from Nikke Knatterton series - you all remember those, right? Next up is “Itsehän sen tein” (”I did it myself”), a funky almost downtempo track with a very melancholic trumpet. The third good one is “Yli rajojen” (”Over the borders”), a bboy friendly midtempo funk track with breaks and a quite banging percussive beat. Both of the latter are written by Petersen himself. Of all his albums, Mukana musiikki is clearly the funkiest one.


Strip-tease


Itsehän sen tein


Yli rajojen

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under easy listening, europe, funk | No Comments »

Oiling boiling - Oiling boiling

September 8th, 2011

Oiling Boiling - Oiling BoilingOILING BOILING

  • Oiling boiling
  • Ufo
  • 1971
  • Finland

Drummer Matti Oiling (RIP) is one of the legends in the history of Finnish funky music. 1942 born Oiling started his musical career at the end on 1950s. During the 1960s Oiling played “rautalanka”-music in Sweden with The Telstars and was forming the first Finnish supergroup The Jormas. He also played a short period in The Boys (backing band for Eero and Jussi Raittinen). Oiling’s own band Oiling boiling was formed in 1969 - at that time it was called Happy jazz band. Their self-titled debut Happy jazz band was released in 1970 on Finnlevy label. In 1971 the band released their second album on Ufo, Finnlevy’s small sublabel that released only 4 albums with really small quantities. In 1971 their name was already settled to Oiling boiling and therefore this second album was also a self-titled one.

There’s pretty strong line-up on this album. Matti Bergström on Fender bass, Martti Metsäketo on saxophone and flute, Pentti Lasanen on saxophone, trumpet and flute, Kaj Backlund on trumpet, Tuomo Tanska on piano and organ, Kalle Lae on guitar and Matti Oiling himself on drums and percussion. Like their first album, this one also mixes jazz with strong influences of rock and funk. Along the funky drumming and breaks there’s a strong funky feel even on those jazzier tracks. “Simple pimple” and “Soul rock” are both quality soul-jazz tracks, where latter has some serious guitar working too. Funky midtempo “Boom bang basch” has a quite long percussion breakdown in the middle. Besides those, there’s two standout tracks that are both nice bboy friendly uptempo funk-groovers. “Polar carneval” starts with a banging beat and later some strange slightly sitar-a-like horn sounds follow. The whole song is a continuous latin-esque breakdown with occasional whistles. “Beka” has slightly less tempo but is still a great one. It starts with a nice break and continues as a horn driven jazzy funk track. Like all the Ufo label releases, this is really tough to find and pricy album, but it’s been reissued as a cd and is also rumored to be reissued as a vinyl too. Luckily the two best tracks “Polar carnival” and “Beka” are released as a double side groover 45 (Ufo S 201) that is a little easier to find and could be found with a reasonable price.


Soul rock


Simple pimple


Boom bang basch


Polar carnival


Beka

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 12.08, filed under europe, funk, souljazz | No Comments »

Kirka - Kirka keikalla

February 21st, 2011

Kirka - Kirka KeikallaKIRKA

  • Kirka keikalla
  • Scandia
  • 1969
  • Finland

Born to a Russian emigrant family in 1950, Kirill “Kirka” Babitzin was one of the most popular singers in Finland. He started his career with his first band The Creatures as early as 1962 when he was only twelve years old. Kirka got his big break in 1967 when he joined Ilkka “Danny” Lipsanen’s band The Islanders, and the very same year his first solo hit single “Hetki lyö” was released. In 1969 was released this live album Kirka keikalla and later in the same year his self titled album, a compilation of his singles. Kirka keikalla was a so called studio live album. It was recorded in Scandia’s recording studio in February 1969 with backing band The Islanders and members of Kirka fan club as an audience. It was also the first live album released in Finland. Kirka’s passing in 2007 was a really sad moment and with him died a big piece of Finnish soul and rock history.

The songs on this one are mostly cover songs. The only exception a medley of Kirka’s hits “Hetki lyö”, Leijat”, “Ehkä suukon antaa saan” and “Viimeiseen mieheen”. First song on the album is a cover of The Temptations‘ hit “Get ready”. Rare earth also did a 21 minute bboy friendly version of the same song, but Kirka’s version follows quite strictly the original. There’s two James Brown covers too, downtempo soul tracks “I’ll go crazy” and “It’s a man’s man’s man’s world”. “I can’t stop loving you” and “What’d I say” from Ray Charles’s repertoire are also included. In my opinion the best song is “Hold On, I’m Coming” originally released by Sam and Dave. The only weird thing is, that it’s dedicated to Tom Jones in the introduction speech. This is a nice live album, too bad they didn’t got very good sound quality for a reason or another even though it was recorded in a studio. The album was later in the 1980s released with the name Live 68, even though it’s recorded in 1969.


Get ready


I’ll go crazy


It’s a man’s man’s man’s world


Hold on, I’m coming


Hetki lyö / Leijat / Ehkä suukon antaa saan / Viimeiseen mieheen

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, rock, soul | No Comments »
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