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Eddy Louiss - Histoire sans parole

November 2nd, 2011

Eddy Louiss - Histoire Sans ParoleEDDY LOUISS

  • Histoire sans parole
  • Goss records
  • 1979
  • France

Organist Eddy Louiss (real name Edward Louise) was born in France, 1941. His father was a talented musician of Martiniquan descent and his mother was a French schoolteacher. They both encouraged little Edward to the land of music, and he started his piano lessons at the age of five. Later he continued to study harmony and music theory in conservatory, and also toured with his father on casino summer tours playing piano and singing. Edward quit school at the age of 16 and fully concentrated on music thereafter. His professional career begun in 1961 with one Daniel Humair. Almost two decades later his solo album Histoire sans parole was released on a small Goss label. During his career, Eddy Louiss have been involved with dozens and dozens of recordings, but he did only few straight solo albums.

Histoire sans parole is a quite pure jazzfunk album. With a range of songs from midtempo groovers to uptempo floorfillers, it’s a one truly magnificent record. Uptempo “St. Cyprien” and midtempo “Sagittaire” are both nice jazzfunk groovers, the latter being among my all time favorite French jazzfunk tracks. Last song, the midtempo “Insomnie” is an almost 11 minute monster rare groove jazzfunk track that is very close to “Sagittaire” what comes to its splendor. Three other tracks on this album, “Histoire sans parole”, “Canon” and “Capricorne” aren’t that bad either.


St. Cyprien


Sagittaire


Insomnie

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, jazzfunk | No Comments »

Bobby Boyd congress - Bobby Boyd congress

March 21st, 2011

Bobby Boyd Congress - Bobby Boyd CongressBOBBY BOYD CONGRESS

  • Bobby Boyd congress
  • Okapi
  • 1971
  • France

Bobby Boyd congress was formed on Long Island, NY. Deciding America was already overloaded with funk acts, they moved to France in 1971 and recorded this one album. The self titled Bobby Boyd congress album was originally pressed with really small amounts of 300 or so. When their frontman Bobby Boyd returned to the States, guitarist Larry Jones, bassist Lafayette Hudson, keyboardist Frank Abel, horn players Ronnie James Buttacavoli and Arthur Young, drummer Ernest “Donny” Donable and percussionists Keno Speller and Arthur Young renamed the band as Ice. After the success of Ice’s debut album in 1973 their producer Pierre Jaubert changed the group’s name to the Lafayette afro rock band and the rest is history.

This album, Bobby Boyd congress, is truly a great album. Their sound is a mixture of funk and soul with a hint of rock. A combination of funky guitars, brass, organ and tight drums. The sound is clearly a foretaste of what’s coming later in their career with Ice and Lafayette afro rock band. There’s no fillers in this album. Songs vary from mellow ballads like “I’m undecided” to midtempo funky soul tracks like “In this strange strange land”. There’s several highlights on this great album. “In a toy garden” starts with a 1:40 intro and suddenly turns into a psychedelic funk jam with nice funky drums and a lot of electric guitar. And the guitars still disturb me a little. “Straight ahead” is a rough midtempo funk track with a break in the middle. Uptempo “Train” is also a good one. The best track however is “It’s good to see your face again” that starts a little mellow’ish, but turns into a frantic funk monster. There’s even a huge break in the middle. Bobby Boyd congress was reissued by Vadim music in 2011 with limited quantities, so finally it was possible to get this album without paying over 800 euros.


In this strange strange land


Straight ahead


Train


In a toy garden


It’s good to see your face again

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, funk, soul | No Comments »

Guy Pederson & Raymond Guiot - Contrebasses

March 9th, 2011

Guy Pedersen - ContrebassesGUY PEDERSEN & RAYMOND GUIOT

  • Contrebasses
  • Tele music
  • 1970
  • France

Established in the late 1960s, Paris based Tele music may not be as famous as the bigger French production library companies like Montparnasse 2000 or Chappell, but it was equally good when it comes to funky library releases. Contrebasses from 1970 was a concept album composed by well known session musicians Guy Pedersen and Raymond Guiot. The musical scenery is built around the bass sound but there’s of course other instruments involved too than the double bass of Guy Pedersen - drums and percussion played by AndrĂ© Arpino and flute, piano and harpsichord played by Raymond Guiot.

Music in Contrebasses is pretty much what it should be when it comes to a library release. Quite wide variety of styles from downtempo drama to uptempo funky beat. There’s three tracks that go over the others. Midtempo groovers “Indian pop bass” and “Les copains de la basse” and uptempo “Bass session”. Contrebasses is definitely one of funky ones among those countless French library records that were released.


Indian pop bass


Les copains de la basse


Bass session

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, library, rare groove | 1 Comment »

T.N.T.H. - Let’s go children of the country

January 11th, 2011

T.N.T.H. - Let's go children of the countryT.N.T.H.

  • Let’s go children of the country
  • Barclay
  • 1971
  • France

Very little is known of this French band called T.N.T.H. except that they did one album in 1971 and few 45’s and that they played really funky latin influenced rock music. The band consisted of Michel Carre (bass), Michel Gouty (drums), Pierre Nacabal (guitar), Didier Gervais (organ), Gerald Russo (percussion) and a horn section formed by Gilbert di Niro, Remi Gauthier and Bernard Buisson. Gouty, Nacabal and di Niro later formed a disco band called Final Offspring and then a rock band called Peter Brain & Brain Trick but of the other guys I know nothing.

This was one of the first records I ever bought from the eBay. I got it for bargain price because it was located in Israel and I think not that many people wanted to risk their money on a record in a country that was very unstable back then.

The best song is the well-known latin funk influenced dancefloor track “Hippopotamus” with really tight breakbeat drums and catchy horn stabs. That’s not all on this one of course. The drummer seems to be on fire almost throughout the whole album and there are no fillers at all. “Everybody listen to my song” is an uptempo funkrock song with a tight percussion/bass breakdown. “Sabbath” is a tight uptempo latin funk track with a slightly disturbing female vocals. “Every day” and “In memory” are both really enjoyable groovy midtempo funkrock tracks aswell as “The beach”. The mellow “Trying to be free” was even sampled by Gnarls Barkley on his The odd couple album. The last track called “T.N.T.H.” is seemingly the theme song of the band. It’s an uptempo latin funk track in a Sapo and Malo manner that is almost as good as “Hippopotamus”. Or even better, I can’t choose. In general Let’s go children of the country is a really tight latin funkrock album. Nuff said.


Every day


In memory


Everybody listen to my song


T.N.T.H.


Hippopotamus (parts I & II)

Written by Mista Tibbz, at 18.00, filed under europe, funkrock, latin funk | No Comments »
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